Rule of third

rule of thirds for beginners

In most cases, this will likely be the upper of the two horizontal lines, but the bottom one should always be considered as well.

It works by imagining that your image is divided into nine parts.

Understanding rule of thirds

To help you out, some cameras have a setting which overlays a rule of thirds grid onto your photo. Composition can help make one photo of an object quite a bit different than another photo of the same thing. When the entire scene is interesting, placing the subject up close to the edge or even in a corner is a good way to highlight that. In most cases, this will likely be the upper of the two horizontal lines, but the bottom one should always be considered as well. But which of those intersecting lines should you use? This places a rule of thirds grid on top of your image as you crop it, allowing you to get your positioning spot on. If filming a moving subject, the same pattern is often followed, with the majority of the extra room being in front of the person the way they are moving. Breaking the Rule As with all rules at least in photography , the rule of thirds doesn't apply in every situation, and sometimes breaking it can result in a much more eye-catching, interesting photo. A centered composition can highlight symmetry as well as some lines and patterns. When to break the rule of thirds Like any rule inside a creative application, the rule of thirds can and sometimes should be broken. In this article, we will share how the rule of thirds works in photography.

This composition is one of the trickiest to do and do right, though. When your photo tells a story, sometimes a centered or even extreme side placement conveys the story better than the rule of thirds.

Rule of thirds examples

This also applies to photos of people, but the previously mentioned guidelines should usually take priority over this one and often take care of the issue of a centered horizon. So, I kept the focus on the sunrise by placing it on one of the four points of interest. Because the two men are located on opposite points of interest using the rule of thirds, this creates an interesting composition. In a landscape photo , place the horizon on one of those horizontal grid lines, instead of dead center in the photo. Place them at one of the intersections on the rule of thirds grid to give the shot a clear focal point. Breaking the Rule As with all rules at least in photography , the rule of thirds doesn't apply in every situation, and sometimes breaking it can result in a much more eye-catching, interesting photo. Use[ edit ] The rule of thirds is applied by aligning a subject with the guide lines and their intersection points, placing the horizon on the top or bottom line, or allowing linear features in the image to flow from section to section. The rule of thirds is a basic principle that helps you to compose interesting and balanced shots. Enjoy this tutorial about the Rule of Thirds? On the other hand, he does not discuss the now-common idea that intersections of the third-lines of the frame are particularly strong or interesting for composition. The theory is that if you place points of interest in the intersections or along the lines that your photo becomes more balanced and will enable a viewer of the image to interact with it more naturally. The symmetry or pattern is more easily identifiable when the photo is centered.

Composition can help make one photo of an object quite a bit different than another photo of the same thing. Imagine your image is divided into sections by a tic-tac-toe board like the grid here: The rule of thirds simply suggests that you place your subject on one of the places that those lines intersect.

rule of thirds math

Experiment and test out different compositions even if they go against any "rules" you've learned. The theory is that if you place points of interest in the intersections or along the lines that your photo becomes more balanced and will enable a viewer of the image to interact with it more naturally.

In this portrait, I placed the man plucking the tea plants at the right-hand side of the image. In his book Remarks on Rural Scenery, Smith quotes a work by Sir Joshua Reynoldsin which Reynolds discusses, in unquantified terms, the balance of dark and light in a painting.

Another reason to abandon the rule of thirds is symmetry. As follows.

rule of thirds in art
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Who Wrote the Rule of Thirds?