Changing age structure implications for

He said that population ageing raised the number of elderly dependents just as the number of child dependents had fallen, putting renewed pressure on consumption and slowing the growth of per capita income.

Factors affecting age structure of population

At the same time, he called on the international community to pursue and promote South-South cooperation to that end. The old age pension schemes would have to finance the standard of living of a growing number of pensioners, while the population of the active age would decrease. Turning to the work of the Commission, she then said that a shift in ageing structures was occurring around the world, and there was not one country or region that was exempt from the substantial implications of that trend. The first dividend was transitory. Policy makers should weigh their costs and benefits. Europe had low fertility. To that end, he welcomed the decision of the Government of Spain, along with the Economic Commission for Europe ECE to hold a review conference on the ageing targets. It might also lead, however, to increased accumulation of wealth per capita, which generated non-labour income and raised labour productivity. While a group of middle-income countries had the opportunity to benefit from the productive ability of relatively large groups of working-age populations, the least developed countries still showed high levels of fertility and delay in their demographic transitions. As younger generations had fewer members than those preceding them, public transfer systems had become hard pressed to provide support in old age to increasing number of older persons. Poverty was particularly common among older persons, especially women living on their own, or as heads of households. For one thing, no one had foreseen the escalation of the AIDS pandemic, from 14 million people living with the virus in to 40 million today. On international cooperation, the strategy called on the ECE Secretariat to assist member States in implementing and evaluating relevant achievements. That was perhaps no coincidence, with the notable declines in fertility and mortality, the rapid process of population ageing had become an emerging reality that challenged a growing number of countries in the region.

Countries would need to respond to the new realities —- high levels of fertility in the developing world and rapidly ageing population in developed nations —- with appropriate policies and programmes to meet the needs of all age groups. Ageing was, first and foremost, a fundamentally positive message, offering new opportunities, particularly for the elderly.

Changing age structure implications for

The creation of sustained financial resources for the developing countries through increased official development assistance ODA and debt cancellation would remain crucial to enable them to pursue various targeted policy interventions to realize benefits from the demographic transition. Longer life required increased savings for retirement. And fertility levels had dropped in population after population. On international cooperation, the strategy called on the ECE Secretariat to assist member States in implementing and evaluating relevant achievements. If the elderly were supported by their adult children, then they saved less and held less wealth. Young people must be more than mere beneficiaries of the system, but actors in their own right and a necessary partner in development. The report provided an overview of the state of population age structures today and prospects for the future, together with a comprehensive discussion of the major social and economic implications of the changes foreseen. Reductions in the size of future generations was a major achievement that could be converted into even greater gains by ensuring that the right institutional arrangements and policy initiatives were developed to make the most of the opportunities that population ageing brought. Consequently, all countries were experiencing some change in their age structures according to their respective stages of the demographic transition. The first dividend was transitory. To the extent that they were supported by unfunded public pensions, they had less reason to save and held less wealth. Moreover, the number was increasing at twice the rate of the total population.

Consequently, all countries were experiencing some change in their age structures according to their respective stages of the demographic transition.

The rise in old age consumption has a silver lining, however, to the extent that the elderly fund their own consumption by accumulating wealth or capital during their working years. Those statistics were starkly contrasted in the least developed countries, where overall population growth was rapid with slower ageing trends.

The report provided an overview of the state of population age structures today and prospects for the future, together with a comprehensive discussion of the major social and economic implications of the changes foreseen. Last year, the Commission had undertaken a thorough and comprehensive consideration of international migration issues.

It was, therefore, imperative that countries be prepared to respond to the new realities of ageing societies with appropriate policies to meet the needs of all age groups.

why is age structure important?

Reductions in the size of future generations was a major achievement that could be converted into even greater gains by ensuring that the right institutional arrangements and policy initiatives were developed to make the most of the opportunities that population ageing brought.

Population ageing raised the number of elderly dependents, just as the number of child dependents had fallen, putting renewed pressure on consumption and slowing the growth of per capita income, he said.

If effective measures were not in place, the future increase in the proportions of working-age groups due to current high fertility might not create the same window of opportunity for development as it did in some middle-income countries.

Factors affecting age structure of population

The first dividend occurred quite mechanically, regardless of institutional setting. Adding together the child dependency ratio and the old age dependency ratio, the total dependency ratio initially rose, followed by a period of decline in the total dependency ratio. The elderly held more assets than others. They were, therefore, blazing a trail that other populations might follow. The Government officials acting as focal points were expected to play key roles in the review and appraisal of Madrid and the regional strategy at national levels and to act as primary contact points for regional level activities. Turning to the Madrid Assembly on Ageing, he said that it was important to translate the agreements made there into national, regional and international action. In the United States, the age profile of earnings was not much different, with consumption rising throughout the lifecycle. Employment creation in developing countries required employment-intensive economic growth, combined with a coherent set of employment and human development policies. In the Arab region, where the onset of fertility decline was a relatively new trend, the process of population ageing was also in its early stage.

Fertility decline has led to a demographic dividend as the number of dependent children has declined relative to the number of working-age adults.

Rated 9/10 based on 73 review
Download